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Quotes about Travel and Tourism

 

But that's the glory of foreign travel, as far as I am concerned. I don't want to know what people are talking about. I can't think of anything that excites a greater sense of childlike wonder than to be in a country where you are ignorant of almost everything. Suddenly you are five years old again. You can't read anything, you have only the most rudimentary sense of how things work, you can't even reliably cross a street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses. (Bill Bryson, Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe)

The farther one travels, the less one knows
(The Inner Light, The Beatles)

 

Because he had no place he could stay in without getting tired of it and because there was nowhere to go but everywhere, keep rolling under the stars... (Jack Kerouac, On the Road)

 

Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world. (Gustave Flaubert)

 

We leave something of ourselves behind when we leave a place, we stay there, even though we go away. And there are things in us that we can find again only by going back there. (Pascal Mercier, Night Train to Lisbon)

 

I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them. (Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer Abroad)

 

I am awfully greedy; I want everything from life. I want to be a woman and to be a man, to have many friends and to have loneliness, to work much and write good books, to travel and enjoy myself, to be selfish and to be unselfish… You see, it is difficult to get all which I want. And then when I do not succeed I get mad with anger. (Simone de Beauvoir)

I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. (Robert Louis Stevenson, Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes)

 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime. (Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad / Roughing It)

 

Cities were always like people, showing their varying personalities to the traveler. Depending on the city and on the traveler, there might begin a mutual love, or dislike, friendship, or enmity. Where one city will rise a certain individual to glory, it will destroy another who is not suited to its personality. Only through travel can we know where we belong or not, where we are loved and where we are rejected. (Roman Payne, Cities & Countries)

Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind. (Anthony Bourdain)

A journey is best measured in friends, rather than miles. (Tim Cahill)

 

Even people whose lives have been made various by learning sometimes find it hard to keep a fast hold on their habitual views of life, on their faith in the Invisible - nay, on the sense that their past joys and sorrows are a real experience, when they are suddenly transported to a new land, where the beings around them know nothing of their history, and share none of their ideas - where their mother earth shows another lap, and human life has other forms than those on which their souls have been nourished. Minds that have been unhinged from their old faith and love have perhaps sought this Lethean influence of exile in which the past becomes dreamy because its symbols have all vanished, and the present too is dreamy because it is linked with no memories. (George Eliot, Silas Marner)

Thus, the question of how and when to start vagabonding is not really a question at all. Vagabonding starts now. Even if the practical reality of travel is still months or years away, vagabonding begins the moment you stop making excuses, start saving money, and begin to look at maps with the narcotic tingle of possibility. From here, the reality of vagabonding comes into sharper focus as you adjust your worldview and begin to embrace the exhilarating uncertainty that true travel promises. (Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel)

Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next, moves slowly over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another. Indeed, he would have found it difficult to tell, among the many places he had lived, precisely where it was he had felt most at home. (Paul Bowles, The Sheltering Sky)

All that old road of the past unreeling dizzily as if the cup of life had been overturned and everything gone mad. My eyes ached in nightmare day (235). (Jack Kerouac)

 

When we get these thruways across the whole country, as we will and must, it will be possible to drive from New York to California without seeing a single thing. (John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America)

 

Such people, while useful, even agreeable, to others, are, if truth be told, frequently unhappy–lonely in fact. Yes, they seek out others, and it may even seem to them that in a certain country or city they have managed to find true kinship and fellowship, having come to know and learn about a people; but they wake up one day and suddenly feel that nothing actually binds them to these people, that they can leave here at once. They realize that another country, some other people, have now beguiled them, and that yesterday’s most riveting event now pales and loses all meaning and significance. For all intents and purposes, they do not grow attached to anything, do not put down deep roots. Their empathy is sincere, but superficial. If asked which of the countries they have visited they like best, they are embarrassed–they do not know how to answer. Which one? In a certain sense–all of them. There is something compelling about each. To which country would they like to return once more? Again, embarrassment–they had never asked themselves such a question. The one certainty is that they would like to be back on the road, going somewhere. To be on their way again–that is the dream. (Ryszard Kapuściński, Travels with Herodotus)

Too often when we say we feel joyful, we’re really feeling manic. There is a frenetic nature to our joy, a whiff of panic; we’re afraid the moment might end abruptly. But then there are other moments when our joy is more solidly grounded. I am not speaking of a transcendental moment, of bliss, but something less. (Eric Weiner, The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World)

I would go to parties and say I was an editor, and people, especially women – and that was important to me back then – would say, Oh, really? and raise their eyebrows and look at me a little more carefully. I remember the first party I went to after I became a teacher, someone asked me what I did for a living, and I said, Well, I teach high school. He looked over my shoulder, nodded his head, said, I went to high school, and walked away.
Once I repeated this anecdote around a big table full of Mexican food in the garden at a place called La Choza in Chicago, and Becky Mueller, another teacher at the school, said that I was a storyteller. I liked that. I was looking for something to be other than just a teacher, and storyteller felt about right. I am a teacher and a storyteller in that order. I have made my living and my real contribution to my community as a teacher, and I have been very lucky to have found that calling, but all through the years I have entertained myself and occasionally other people by telling stories. (Peter Ferry, Travel Writing)

To have come on all this new world of writing, with time to read in a city like Paris where there was a way of living well and working, no matter how poor you were, was like having a great treasure given to you. You could take your treasure with you when you traveled too, and in the mountains where we lived in Switzerland and Italy, until we found Schruns in the high valley in the Vorarlberg in Austria, there were always the books, so that you lived in the new world you had found, the snow and the forests and the glaciers and their winter problems and your high shelter in the Hotel Taube in the village in the day time, and at night you could live in the other wonderful world the Russian writers were giving you. (Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast)

The traveler was active; he went strenuously in search of people, of adventure, of experience. The tourist is passive; he expects interesting things to happen to him. He goes sightseeing.Daniel J. Boorstin. (The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America)

 

I had observed that most people who wrote stories of travel journeyed over the country in firstclass coaches. They visited only the great cities and points of known interest. . . . Their stories are of beaten paths and, dress them as artistically and originally as they may, they are only telling a tale that has been told. While making no particular claim to superiority in writing, I thought by assuming the garb of a sailor and traveling as one of the plain, everyday toilers I could get closer to nature and her children and tell a story of our country such as had never been told. (Krohn, John Albert. The Walk of Colonial Jack)

Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life - and travel - leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks - on your body or on your heart - are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt. (Anthony Bourdain, The Nasty Bits)

 

If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel – as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them – wherever you go. (Anthony Bourdain, Medium Raw)

 

I depart,

Whither I know not; but the hour's gone by

When Albion's lessening shores could grieve or glad mine eye.

(Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)

 

The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land. (G. K. Chesterton, Tremendous Trifles)

 

They say travel broadens the mind; but you must have the mind. (G. K. Chesterton, The Poet and the Lunatics)

 

The traveller sees what he sees, the tripper sees what he has come to see. (G. K. Chesterton, Autobiography)

 

In travelling

I shape myself betimes to idleness

And take fools' pleasure.

(George Eliot, The Spanish Gypsy)

 

Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not. (Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First Series)

 

Phileas Fogg had won his wager, and had made his journey around the world in eighty days. To do this, he had employed every means of conveyance -steamers, railways, carriages, yachts, trading-vessels, sledges, elephants. The eccentric gentleman had throughout displayed all his marvellous qualities of coolness and exactitude. But what then? What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought from his long and weary journey?

Nothing, say you? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men!

Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?

(Verne, Jules. Around the world in eighty days)

 

Go far—too far you cannot, still the farther

The more experience finds you: And go sparing;—

One meal a week will serve you, and one suit,

Through all your travels; for you'll find it certain,

The poorer and the baser you appear,

The more you look through still.

(John Fletcher, The Woman's Prize, or The Tamer Tamed)

The soul of the journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases. (William Hazlitt, On Going a Journey)

 

The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are. (Samuel Johnson, Letter to Hester Thrale)

 

Let him go abroad to a distant country; let him go to some place where he is not known. Don't let him go to the devil where he is known. (Samuel Johnson, reported in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson)

 

As the Spanish proverb says, He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him. So it is in travelling: a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge. (Samuel Johnson, reported in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson)

 

Though they carry nothing forth with them, yet in all their journey they lack nothing. For wheresoever they come, they be at home. (Sir Thomas More. Of Their Journeying or Travelling Abroad)

 

Why do you wonder that globe-trotting does not help you, seeing that you always take yourself with you? The reason which set you wandering is ever at your heels. (Socrates. In Seneca the Younger. On Travel as a Cure for Discontent, Moral Letters to Lucilius)

 

When I was at home, I was in a better place; but travellers must be content. (William Shakespeare, As You Like It)

 

To travel hopefully is better than to arrive. (Robert Louis Stevenson. El Dorado, Virginibus Puerisque)

 

If you travel from choice and not from necessity, you are as glad to be on the road again as you were to rest a day, for to the born traveler there is nothing quite so satisfactory as motion. When the train moves out of the depot or the steamer leaves her wharf, then is such a person truly happy. (Leland, Lilian. Traveling Alone)

 

A rolling stone gathers no moss. (Publius Syrus. Moral Sayings)

 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness. (Mark Twain, Innocents Abroad)

 

Good company in a journey makes the way to seem the shorter. (Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler)

 

When we have discovered a continent, or crossed a chain of mountains, it is only to find another ocean or another plain upon the further side…. O toiling hands of mortals! O wearied feet, travelling ye know not whither! Soon, soon, it seems to you, you must come forth on some conspicuous hilltop, and but a little way further, against the setting sun, descry the spires of El Dorado. Little do ye know your own blessedness; for to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, and the true success is to labour. (Robert Louis Stevenson, El Dorado)

Blowin' In The Wind - Bob Dylan

How many roads must a man walk down
Before you call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they're forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind
Yes, 'n' how many years can a mountain exist
Before it's washed to the sea?
Yes, 'n' how many years can some people exist
Before they're allowed to be free?
Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn't see?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind
Yes, 'n' how many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

 

Sources: Wikiquote.org; Goodreads.com; Cited books

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